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Lockheed U-2 "Dragon Lady" Super Pods Configuration

Print Sizes Available: 

  • Large: 17 x 13"
  • Small: 11 x 8.5"

Illustrated by: Eric Lian

Customization of this aircraft tail number is available at no additional charge.

Lockheed U-2 "Dragon Lady" Super Pods Configuration is an art print from an original illustration. (This is not a photograph) 
Meticulously detailed, the U2 "Dragon Lady" is set against the Air Combat Command insignia , and the description text is bordered by the unit and Air Combat Command insignias.

Perfect for award presentations, the office or home, or as a gift for that aviation fan.
Printed on high quality, heavy weight Luster paper using a 12-color pigmented, archival ink system.

  • Edition Size: Open
  • Paper Type: Heavy Weight Luster
  • Ink Type: Lucia EX Archival Pigment 
  • Illustrated by: Eric Lian
  • Published and printed by: Lian Media

The description on the print states:

The U-2S is a single-seat, single-engine, high-altitude/near space reconnaissance and surveillance aircraft providing signals, imagery, and electronic measurements and signature intelligence. It is powered by a General Electric F118-101 engine, which negates the need for air refueling on long duration missions. Long and narrow wings give the U-2 glider-like characteristics and allow it to quickly lift heavy sensor payloads to unmatched altitudes, keeping them there for extended periods of time. The U-2 is capable of gathering a variety of imagery, including multi-spectral electro-optic, infrared, and synthetic aperture radar products which can be stored or sent to ground exploitation centers. The configuration depicted is a standard U-2S with "super-pods" attached underneath its wings. Super-pods are used for carrying many types of surveillance equipment, including various data-links, although they can also be totally empty.

The U-2 also carries a signals intelligence payload, which can be transmitted in near real-time anywhere in the world via air-to-ground or air-to-satellite data links, rapidly providing critical information to combatant commanders.

Routinely flown at altitudes over 70,000 feet, the pilot wears a full pressure suit similar to those worn by astronauts. The low-altitude handling characteristics of the aircraft and bicycle-type landing gear require precise control inputs during landing; forward visibility is also limited due to the extended aircraft nose and "taildragger" configuration. A second U-2 pilot normally "chases" each landing in a high-performance vehicle, assisting the pilot by providing radio inputs for altitude and runway alignment. These characteristics combine to earn the U-2 a widely accepted title as the most difficult aircraft in the world to fly.




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