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Lockheed U-2 "Dragon Lady" Senior Span/Spur Configuration

Print Sizes Available: 

  • Large: 17 x 13"
  • Small: 11 x 8.5"

Illustrated by: Eric Lian

Customization of this aircraft tail number is available at no additional charge.

Lockheed U-2 "Dragon Lady" Senior Span/Spur Configuration is an art print from an original illustration. (This is not a photograph) 

Meticulously detailed, the U2 "Dragon Lady" is set against the Air Combat Command insignia , and the description text is bordered by the unit and Air Combat Command insignias.

Perfect for award presentations, the office or home, or as a gift for that aviation fan.
Printed on high quality, heavy weight Luster paper using a 12-color pigmented, archival ink system.

 

  • Edition Size: Open
  • Paper Type: Heavy Weight Luster
  • Ink Type: Lucia EX Archival Pigment 
  • Illustrated by: Eric Lian
  • Published and printed by: Lian Media

The description on the print states:

The U-2S is a single-seat, single-engine, high-altitude/near space reconnaissance and surveillance aircraft providing signals, imagery, and electronic measurements and signature intelligence. It is powered by a General Electric F118-101 engine, which negates the need for air refueling on long duration missions. Long and narrow wings give the U-2 glider-like characteristics and allow it to quickly lift heavy sensor payloads to unmatched altitudes, keeping them there for extended periods of time. The U-2 is capable of gathering a variety of imagery, including multi-spectral electro-optic, infrared, and synthetic aperture radar products which can be stored or sent to ground exploitation centers. The radome depicted in this configuration is a satellite communications system known as either Senior Span or Senior Spur, depending on how the jet is configured. Senior Span is fitted to provide the conveyance of signals intelligence collection data beyond line of sight and around the globe. Senior Spur is used for transmitting other forms of data, including image intelligence and electronic intelligence gathered by the U-2's sensors.

Routinely flown at altitudes over 70,000 feet, the pilot wears a full pressure suit similar to those worn by astronauts. The low-altitude handling characteristics of the aircraft and bicycle-type landing gear require precise control inputs during landing; forward visibility is also limited due to the extended aircraft nose and "taildragger" configuration. A second U-2 pilot normally "chases" each landing in a high-performance vehicle, assisting the pilot by providing radio inputs for altitude and runway alignment. These characteristics combine to earn the U-2 a widely accepted title as the most difficult aircraft in the world to fly.




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